How to get blogs to the top of Google

Here’s a fine idea from NYU journalism teacher and maverick Jay Rosen on how to get your blog to the top of Google. It concerns an anecdote by 60 Minutes‘ Lesley Stahl about reporting on President Ronald Reagan.

Jay Rosen's Tweet

It takes the idea that if you can provide a version of a story that the originator has not even done, then people will go to your blog. Rosen himself (see below), correcting my original posting, states that:

It’s a tale many people remember or have heard of; [Stahl] told it not once but many times. But there was no clearly stated online version of it. My post provides that, and some analysis of what this story means, why so many people refer to it. It’s the most complete link for that story.

I called it analysis rather than reporting. Again Rosen argues:

The point, I think, is not that “analysis” wins out over “reporting,” it’s that over time Google rewards the organizing of information. My post is an organized look at this story Lesley Stahl tells about covering Reagan and the pictures vs. the words.

Rosen's blog comment beats the original story on Google

Rosen's blog comment beats the original story on Google

See Jay Rosen’s original posting.

Want to see another way to get your blog to the top of Google, click here.

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About John Welsh

John Welsh has spent his entire working life in business-to-business media, first traditional publishing, having edited three magazines over 14 years, and, second, exhibitions since 2007. He started this blog on 22 June 2008 and ended it on 18 May 2010.
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One Response to How to get blogs to the top of Google

  1. Jay Rosen says:

    Hi there. Thanks for your post. About “the idea that if you can explain a story, then people will go to your blog in preference to the story itself – analysis over reporting.” This is not exactly what happened, or what I meant. If you look at the second Google result, it’s a CBS News bio of Lesley Stahl. Has nothing to do with the particular anecodte I wrote about, which is a story Lesley Stahl told about reporting on Ronald Reagan.

    It’s a tale many people remember or have heard of; she told it not once but many times. But there was no clearly stated online version of it. My post provides that, and some analysis of what this story means, why so many people refer to it. It’s the most complete link for that story.

    The point, I think, is not that “analysis” wins out over “reporting,” it’s that over time Google rewards the organizing of information. My post is an organized look at this story Lesley Stahl tells about covering Reagan and the pictures vs. the words.

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